Category: Weather

22 Oct 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: OCTOBER 12 – 21

Corn has seen a good rally since the lows that came after the report. Due to the world energy values falling, corn is still well above where it was last week, despite the pullback on Thursday. Rain in the eastern corn belt that was expected to slow harvest coming up has turned a little drier but still present. The rains this week will further deteriorate the already poor-quality plants. The yields were coming in better than expected in some areas the first half of harvest, but we should expect them to be lower in the second half.. NOAA on Thursday released its outlook for a warmer winter in the U.S., which hit energy prices and could see them trend lower, which would not help corn, among other things. It is vital this time of year to start paying attention to South American weather, and right now, Argentina is off to a dry start.  Ethanol production continues to grow as margins remain above $1 per bushel, pushing plants to produce at top capacity. This week’s output was the 3rd largest ever and will be an important supporting factor for corn going forward.

Via Barchart

Soybeans have had a good rally since the report, like corn even with the pullback at the end of this week. World bean oil and veg oil markets saw a rally this week that helped pull soybeans up along with many of the same factors as corn. Weekly exports this week were 2x that of last week and the highest in 13 months, with China being the main buyer. According to the most recent USDA report, if we can get consistent demand from China moving forward, that should help soybeans despite the crop being bigger than initially thought. The chart is tough to look at, but the market did close above the 20 day moving average at one point this week. It will not get back to that level to end the week, but the double high of $12.49 ½ this week makes it look like that $12.50 range may be hard to break through unless we get more bullish news. All eyes will move to the 2022 contracts next week as we begin to look at options for stored beans.

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow had another good week as we have seen a good October for the equities market. After a tough September, this is good to see money back in the markets as questions around tapering, inflation and other Fed issues remain. Supply chain woes continue to plague many industries and will probably only worsen with the coming holiday season.

Podcast

In this week’s podcast Simon Quilty, from Melbourne, Australia, and Jeff Malec join Jeff Eizenberg to discuss global meat markets. We get an overview of the global meat market: beef, poultry, and pork, the main players and their main concerns, including labor and shipping shortages being a critical problem. Simon talks about how he goes about hedging the various contracts providing risk management for the current disruption for in-demand meat products.

For additional information, read our blog “Weigh More Than You Wanted To Know About Meat” here: https://www.rcmalternatives.com/2021/10/weigh-more-than-you-wanted-to-know-about-meat-with-agritrends-simon-quilty/

U.S. Drought Monitor

The maps below show the U.S. drought monitor and the comparison to it from a week ago. The outlined areas in black are areas that the drought will have a dominant impact.

Via Barchart.com

28 Sep 2021

2021 Harvest Report — Your First-Hand Look Into Tennessee’s and Mississippi’s Crop Season

As corn, soybeans, and many other crops begin to enter their harvest season, it is time to think about how the harvest is progressing on the farm. According to agriculture.com, soybean harvest progress is at 16%, and the site reported corn to be at 18%. On top of the progress, it showed that most western and northern states were at a pace above average, and southeastern states were progressing below average.

Last week, RCM Ag Services was fortunate to have a first-hand look at a couple of states within this region. Bert Farrish, Director of Commercial Agriculture, ventured out on an 800-mile crop tour throughout Tennessee and the northern Mississippi Delta from September 21-26. Let’s take a look at his 5-day journey across the south and dive into the industry as Farrish provides his very own commentary for a 2021 crop progress assessment.

Is Weather Hindering Western Tennessee?

The tour began in Western Tennessee, where turbulent weather was predicted in the forecast, and it wasn’t long before Bert was met with strong thunderstorms between Nashville and Lexington. As he encountered severe weather along the I-40 corridor, he naturally observed little to no harvest work. “The crops looked relatively good; however, Western Tennessee has a long way to go with this year’s harvest,” Farrish stated.

“There is still a lot of corn and soybean in the field, and I predict that harvest, for both corn and beans, will move well into October.” But it wasn’t just corn and beans that needed additional time this year. “Cotton wasn’t near ready for harvest; I am estimating that the harvest won’t begin until mid-October.”

Driving Into The Delta

As Farrish continued his driving tour into the Mississippi Delta, progress wasn’t much further along, and he stated that this area had also received recent rain showers. “I would say corn was 90% complete in the areas I drove through,” which contained routes along I-69, Hwy 61, Hwy 8, and Hwy 6.

“With some exceptions, most crops looked great!” However, Farrish had stated some crops like rice still had a ways to go. “I would say the crop is later than usual, but they will wrap up the bean harvest in the next few weeks with good weather.”

But as we all know, weather this time of year is unpredictable, especially with rain in the forecast this week at a 60% coverage. Over the weekend, there was a steady line of trucks through Cleveland headed to the port of Rosedale, MS. Combines were running everywhere Saturday, September 25, and Sunday, September 26.

The Bolls Are Open — A Preview of the Cotton Counties

With the driving tour coming to an end, the last assessment concludes with cotton. Harvest for cotton still has a long way to go. Farrish predicts that 30-50% of bolls are open. “There were minimal small fields that were ready to pick, but certainly no one is going to open a gin for a few bales.”

But that doesn’t mean all areas in the Delta need work. The cotton in Coahoma and Quitman counties looks as good as ever. Farrish stated, “Some fieldwork has been done in the north Delta, but I am certain harvest for all crops is further along in the south Delta, meaning Hwy 82 and south to near Vicksburg. But I was unable to see this area in this trip.”

Final Trip Takeaways

Overall, Bert concluded his trip feeling optimistic about the crop prospects. Although some areas need improvement, most crops look strong and are on track to have a strong harvest season.

Visit our blog, Here’s What you Need to Know About the Outlook for the First Week of October, for an additional harvest update on the many unknown/under-reported issues early in the year that we may be seeing played out combined with the dry and hot finish.

27 Aug 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: AUGUST 19-26

Corn was unchanged on the week as slow news, a lack of major export announcements, and no major rain events crossed the area’s most in need. Additionally, most of the corn belt has seen above average temperatures this week keeping a bid under the market. The late season heat and hot nights are taking their toll on the crop but hopefully the heat will end soon according to some forecasts. This time of year, markets begin to look at multiple yield reports coming in from various independent groups – i.e the Pro Farmer Tour (results HERE). At first glance many in the industry feel the tour results are a bit high, but only time will tell.  Any big surprise exports or continued weather problems will be the bulls news while rain and yield reports will be the bears.

Via Barchart

Soybeans made small gains on the week as the same news moved beans that moved corn. China continues to be a buyer going on 2 weeks now which is supportive after their long silence. The market is reacting to these purchases as if they were expected and normal purchases. Regular and consistent purchases will need to continue for the market to remain supportive.  Any abrupt could see another slide heading into harvest before we have a better idea on yield. The rains that some think will help corn will also help beans as we head into September.

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow gained on the week as what seemed to be investor weariness last week turned into buying opportunities. The events in Afghanistan weighed on the market Thursday with uncertainty about the US foreign relations going forward.  As of this morning, Friday 8/27/2021, the S&P and Nasdaq are making fresh all-time highs following the latest comments from the Federal Reserve where NO NEW policy changes were announced and supportive monetary measures will remain in place.

Afghanistan

The suicide bombing by an ISIS-K member Thursday in Kabul, that claimed the lives of dozens of Afghan citizens, along with a dozen US Service members, while injuring countless others, shook the world. The swiftness of the fall of Afghanistan’s army and government to the Taliban has put the US at the center of one of the biggest international situations in recent memory. Going forward the countries around Afghanistan will be important to keep an eye on for exporters to the middle east.

Podcast

Check out our recent podcast where we’ve brought on one of our real-life firefighters from RCM Ag – Jody Lawrence along with Tim Andriesen from the CME Group to provide us with some inside baseball knowledge of the current state of the agriculture markets and to discuss the real-world application of the use of short-dated options to potentially fight the current blaze of volatility surrounding agriculture markets.

https://rcmagservices.com/the-hedged-edge/

US Drought Monitor

The maps below show there was not much change over the week despite weekend rains in some areas that needed it and some drying in Indiana.

Via Barchart.com

23 Jul 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: JULY 15 – 22

Corn made small gains early in the week only to fall short heading into the weekend as weakness continues to creep into the market with poor exports continuing and weather uncertainty. The hottest temperatures of the year for the plains and western corn belt are expected in the next few days with the only relief possibly coming past the 7 day forecast. As bad as things seem in the western corn belt, the eastern corn belt is having great weather, but will it be enough to offset those loses?

Brazil’s crop continues to get smaller, despite the USDA not making any major outlook changes, as they experience more freezing temperatures on their corn crop. China continues to sit on the sideline with no big purchases as they wait for lower prices before buying US corn. We know they will need to make purchases at some point but as we have seen in the past when there is no news from China prices tend to dip until they make a purchase so they will be quiet waiting for the right time to buy.

Via Barchart                          Soybeans had a rough Thursday as the extended forecast offered a chance of help.  We have to remember that extended, is just that – it’s NOT tomorrow – and just as help was added it can go back to hot and dry in one weather report. You’ll note in the chart below that beans have been trading mostly sideways since the start of May. This will probably continue unless some unforeseen news hits the markets or a major weather event/change in forecast happens. The next major report is the August 12th report which could be what finally gets us out of the range (whether to the upside or downside is TBD).

The bean oil market has added volatility to beans as well as the Biden administration’s silence on their direction for the bio fuel industry.  Their lack of action, one way or the other, is hurting beans and bean oil as producers remain with unanswered questions which leads to uneasiness (read volatility).

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow lost on the week (Thursday-Thursday) following a large selloff on Monday followed by 3 straight days of gains. The market was trading positively into the week’s end as well getting back over 35,000 in intraday. The Delta variant worries seem to be biggest fear in the market right now as it spread dangerously throughout under vaccinated areas of the country threatening the continued reopening.

Podcast

Check out our recent podcast with Dr. Greg Willoughby: We’re talking with Greg in the new episode about being a “plant doctor”, weather patterns, GMO & organic produce, crop history, technical advances, level 201 education on agronomy, the agronomy equation, Helena Agri, soil biology, American v European agriculture, Greg’s early background in livestock, and the advancement of native plants to modern produce.

https://rcmagservices.com/the-hedged-edge/

US Drought Monitor

The maps below show the current drought conditions in the US. The second map is last week’s so you can see how the areas that received rain improved or did not. The wild fires continue to rage in the west as smoke from them has carried all the way to Southeastern US.

Via Barchart.com

16 Jul 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: JULY 8 – 15

Corn rallied this week following Monday’s USDA report that was relatively neutral. The USDA left expected US yield the same while slightly lowering the 20/21 ending stocks and raising the 2021 production. The USDA did lower Brazil’s corn production numbers, but some estimates still think they are overstating what it will be. The USDA dropped Brazil’s corn production from 98.5 million tons to 93 million, while only raising Argentina’s 1.5 million. The drought conditions persist in the upper Midwest as some areas are expected to get rain over the weekend. The drought in the Canadian prairies and Dakotas does not have any major relief in the forecast as heat and dryness remains in the next weeks forecast. Exports this week were small but not surprising. Weather continues to be the main driver as markets will react to where it rained and how much over the weekend to start next week. Currently about 36% of the US corn production is in an area experiencing drought. As you can see in the drought monitor below northern Iowa and southern Minnesota is a good amount of that.

Via Barchart                          

Soybeans gained on the week as well following the USDA report. There was no adjustment to expected yield and only slight adjustments higher to ending stocks. Beans kept up their momentum following the report for the week before cooling off Thursday. It will be important how they end the week and open Sunday to set the tone for next week. Weather continues to be the main market mover as it will be important heading into the end of July and August. About 31% of the soybean production is in an area currently experiencing drought so any and all rain will be welcome for the crop but the price will be impacted as well.

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow gained on the week despite growing inflation concerns and Powell’s comments about Fed strategy. The Biden administration’s child tax credit has arrived as well with it going into effect this week. The Delta variant continues to spread around the US with some places beginning to bring back mask requirements.

Podcast

Check out our recent podcast with Dr. Greg Willoughby: We’re talking with Greg in the new episode about being a “plant doctor”, weather patterns, GMO & organic produce, crop history, technical advances, level 201 education on agronomy, the agronomy equation, Helena Agri, soil biology, American v European agriculture, Greg’s early background in livestock, and the advancement of native plants to modern produce.

https://rcmagservices.com/the-hedged-edge/

US Drought Monitor

The maps below show the current drought conditions in the US. The second map is last week’s so you can see how the areas that received rain improved or did not.

Via Barchart.com

 

 

09 Jul 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: JULY 1-8

The corn market fell thanks to the rain that was received in the Upper Midwest over the 4th of July weekend. As always when it rains in areas that need it the most, the market freaks out as if it is a crop making/saving rain. The reality is, although the rain was helpful, there are still significant drought conditions across most of the areas that received rain (see in the drought chart at the bottom). With this said, next week is forecasting rain across the western corn belt providing some more relief to those areas before returning to hot and dry after.

CONAB (Brazil’s USDA) updated their yield expectations this morning by cutting their corn crop by 3 million metric tons (120 million bushels). This change came before a freeze event they had recently which could lead to problems and another cut of their expected crop. The USDA will update their estimates of the South American crop next week in the report.

The weekly ethanol report was bullish as production was 2% ahead of pre-Covid 2019 levels. US drivers drove a record amount over the 4th of July weekend with indications that usage for the summer could be a new record. The USDA is expected to increase their estimates for corn used for ethanol coming up as their numbers are lagging the actual pace.

Via Barchart                        Soybeans, like corn, fell following the holiday weekend with huge losses on Tuesday to start the week. Weather remains the main focus of the markets as rains in the next week will help but forecasts have it followed by heat and dryness. Bean crop conditions this week were down 1% to 59% g/e. The soybean balance sheet does not have as much room for error as corn so any adverse soybean news will be bullish for the market. The long term up trend broke about 3 weeks ago but prices are still at a great level compared to what we were seeing this time last year. The report on Monday will help tell us what other news should be moving the market other than weather but headlines love to say it rained.

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow lost on the week after a tough Thursday in the markets. The market bounced back well off its lows on Thursday into the close however to keep some momentum. The markets have been volatile, but the big picture is important as we have traded in the range above 34,000 for most of the last 2 months. The delta variant has had many people worried and keeping an eye on the market for any indicator of how bad it could end up being for continued reopening around the world.

Lumber

Lumber prices have flattened out the last couple weeks after losing over half its value from the peak. Markets are hinting at this being the beginning of a rebalancing as the producers and suppliers feel out the supply and demand story.

Podcast

Check out our recent podcast with Dr. Greg Willoughby: We’re talking with Greg in the new episode about being a “plant doctor”, weather patterns, GMO & organic produce, crop history, technical advances, level 201 education on agronomy, the agronomy equation, Helena Agri, soil biology, American v European agriculture, Greg’s early background in livestock, and the advancement of native plants to modern produce.

https://rcmagservices.com/the-hedged-edge/

US Drought Monitor

The maps below show the current US drought conditions this week vs last week. As you can see the rain that freaked out some in the markets did not exactly fix the drought problems. The rain was helpful but will need more consistent sustained rain to help the crop in the coming months.

Via Barchart.com

 

 

21 Jun 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: JUNE 11-18

Corn had a volatile week much like beans having a limit down day on Thursday then a strong recovery on Friday. Corn had had a choppy trade this week before Thursday but the collapse in soybeans and soybean oil brought corn down with it. The bearish news for corn was that it was expected to rain in the drought stricken upper Midwest. This rain is much needed and will help but more consistent rainfall over the coming weeks would be needed to help the crop more. The rain will likely pressure markets lower to start the week if forecasts were accurate. If it does not rain as much as predicted it could fuel the bulls to continue from Friday. The dip on Thursday allowed some bulls to get back in the market at an attractive area while the bullish news remains the same.

Via Barchart                          

Soybeans nosedived on Thursday as they took full advantage of the expanded limits and fell over $1. The pressure on beans has been coming from the soybean oil and crush markets as crush numbers have decreased and soybean oil prices have fallen rapidly. With US yield estimates coming in around 52 bpa the price levels from earlier in the year would be hard to get back to. South America had a good bean harvest so there is not as much stress on the supply side like there is for corn. If dryness continues into the summer and yields begin to take a hit we could see a rebound for the bulls. The trade over the next week and half going into the June planted acreage report will give us an idea of what to expect in the report at the end of the month.

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow suffered loses on the week as the Fed announced they would begin looking at raising rates to help combat inflation. Although they said the plan would be to not raise til 2023 the market seems to think that timeline will probably be moved up if inflation accelerates.

Lumber

Lumber prices have dipped recently but are still at very high levels historically. Check out our recent post about the lumber market and what all has been going on.

Podcast

Check out our recent podcast with Dr. Greg Willoughby: We’re talking with Greg in the new episode about being a “plant doctor”, weather patterns, GMO & organic produce, crop history, technical advances, level 201 education on agronomy, the agronomy equation, Helena Agri, soil biology, American v European agriculture, Greg’s early background in livestock, and the advancement of native plants to modern produce.

https://rcmagservices.com/the-hedged-edge/

US Drought Monitor

The map below shows current drought conditions and the continued problems in the upper Midwest. Drought conditions continue in the Midwest with some areas getting relief over the weekend. For reference the second chart below is this time last year.

Via Barchart.com

 

 

11 Jun 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: JUNE 4-11

Corn had another good week that was made better following the bullish news in Thursday’s WASDE report. At the start of the week corn planting was seen as 91% complete with little progress being made from last week but at this point in the process limited progress is expected. The dryness in the Midwest and other areas of the corn belt can be seen in the drought monitor below. The USDA agreed with what many in the industry have been saying by reducing US and world ending stocks.

20/21 US ending stocks was adjusted down to 1.107 billion bushels from 1.257 in the May report while 21/22 ending stocks were adjusted down to 1.357 billion bushels from 1.507 in May. World ending stocks for 20/21 were lowered to 280.60 million tonnes from 283.53 while the 21/22 was also lowered to 289.41 million tonnes from 292.30. There is still a disconnect between the USDA and the public on what’s going on in South America and the size of their crop. Word on the street is that it has been shrinking as weather woes caused issues but the USDA does not have them down nearly as much in this report.

Now that growing season has started weather and specifically where it does and does not rain will be the main price driving factors.  The upper Midwest is dry but the delta just got torrential rains this week and areas in Indiana and Ohio have been soaked too. The rain in the Dakotas and Iowa to end the week will help but still need rain over extended periods to get back to good growing conditions.

Via Barchart

Soybeans slipped a bit on the week but are still hanging on inside the recent range. Bean news has been quiet as of late with no market specific news, unlike corn. Soybean planting was seen as 80% complete to start the week with some continued progress to be made. The USDA WASDE report was more bearish for beans than corn but markets responded well after.

The 20/21 US ending stocks were raised from 120 million bushels to 135 million and the 21/22 ending stocks were raised form 140 million to 155 million bushels respectively. These were both still within trade estimates so no major shock with the US or the world stocks. The 20/21 world ending stocks were raised from 86.55 million tonnes to 88 million and the 21/22 ending stocks were raised from 91.10 million to 92.55. Raising the stocks month over month is usually bearish and old crop took a hit while new crop rallied on the report.

Markets moved lower Friday with rain coming in some much needed areas heading into the weekend.

Via Barchart

Cotton has seen modest gains this week after soaking rains and flooding in areas of the Delta. The WASDE report this week showed the expected directionally bullish revisions. There were no major surprises, but their numbers may be hinting at a continued decline in production going up against the rising levels of global consumption. The USDA projections for 21/22 show a 100,000 bale increase in exports from last month to 14.8 million bales. As exports continue to be strong for the 20/21 crop ending stocks were lowered 200,000 bales to 2.9 million ending stocks. Global ending stocks were lower as well with consumption rising.

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow lost slightly on the week as news was slow with no major market news or movers. Covid openings continue as numbers continue to decline in the US while there are still problems around the world.

Lumber

Lumber prices have dipped recently but are still at very high levels historically. Check out our recent post about the lumber market and what all has been going on.

Podcast

Check out our recent podcast with Dr. Greg Willoughby: We’re talking with Greg in the new episode about being a “plant doctor”, weather patterns, GMO & organic produce, crop history, technical advances, level 201 education on agronomy, the agronomy equation, Helena Agri, soil biology, American v European agriculture, Greg’s early background in livestock, and the advancement of native plants to modern produce.

https://rcmagservices.com/the-hedged-edge/

US Drought Monitor

The map below shows current drought conditions and the continued problems in the upper Midwest. More drought conditions have crept into southern Iowa and parts of Nebraska in the last week. Heat over the next two weeks will be a problem in the Dakotas and western corn belt.

Via Barchart

 

04 Jun 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: MAY 28 – JUNE 4

Volatility continued this week as the market suffered small loses week over week. Corn planting was seen at being 95% planted this week with the first crop condition rating of the year at 76% g/e. Early yield estimates from Barchart.com have national US corn yield at 173.2 BPA for a total yield of 14.4 billion bushels. This implies 90.5 million acres planted with a 92% harvest rate. These numbers would lead to shrinking US ending stocks for 21/22 – NOTE these are just estimates and it is very early in the process.

This weeks volatility was a classic example of a news driven market. One day weather was the main price mover and another outside forces such as metals and the USD pulled markets down across the board. Old crop corn export sales this week were strong coming in at 531.1 tmt and new crop sales were 439.5 tmt. Both of which are solid numbers where old crop sales were better than expected while new crop were within expectation.

Via Barchart

Contrary to Corn, Soybeans made gains on the week. Planting was seen as being 84% completed at the onset with no crop conditions being reported just yet. World veg oil prices rallied during the week pulling beans up with it while corn struggled. With US exports to China lagging in recent weeks, the bullish stance on beans continues to be robust.  Should buying resume, any and all purchases will help the export numbers and further be supportive for the market. This week’s exports were within expectations for both old crop and new crop with new crop leading the way with 180.3 tmt.

Via Barchart

Crude oil continued its gains of recent weeks reaching the highest price in 2 ½ years. The demand for gas continues to grow as lockdowns ease and summer travel, both by cars and air, begins to ramp up. OPEC announced they will up production again in July.  While a bearish on the surface it would seem additional increases will be needed to slow this bull.  Optimism about Europe’s reopening along with the continuation of good news in the US on covid vaccines and reopening of states has been the main driver. US crude oil inventories were also lower this week than the 5 year seasonal average showing the demand is there.

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow gained on the week as it strung together several days of small gains with only small pullbacks. The craziness of the reddit trade returned this week with $AMC, $GME and $BB having wild bouts of volatility. Other indexes finished lower for the week as Nasdaq struggled on Thursday.

JBS

JBS was the victim of a recent cyber attack that caused them to have to shut down many plants. All were up and running by the end of the week but between this and the Colonial hack we may begin seeing more of these targeted attacks effect US consumers.

Lumber

Check out our recent post about the lumber market and what all has been going on. Lumber has leveled off here recently but it is still well ahead of where it was before the run up.

Podcast

Check out our recent podcast with Dr. Greg Willoughby: We’re talking with Greg in the new episode about being a “plant doctor”, weather patterns, GMO & organic produce, crop history, technical advances, level 201 education on agronomy, the agronomy equation, Helena Agri, soil biology, American v European agriculture, Greg’s early background in livestock, and the advancement of native plants to modern produce.

https://rcmagservices.com/the-hedged-edge/

US Drought Monitor

The map below shows this week’s drought conditions across the US. Parts of southern Kansas and northwest Oklahoma got relief this week while parts of North and South Dakota may receive much needed rain in the next week.

PRICES

Via Barchart.com

 

28 May 2021

AG MARKET UPDATE: MAY 22-28

Volatility was the story this week as you can see the dip and bounce back over the last few days in the chart below. Surprisingly it was not the funds alone that triggered the selloff but rather a more balanced mix of funds, commercials, and farmer selling – in short – it appears to have been a bit of profit taking into the end of the month.

Corn had strong exports this week with no major cancellations (despite rumors to start the week).  While these rumors of a cancellation dropped prices aggressively, the subsequent large sales of new crop corn to China, following the dip, ended up saving China quite a bit of money while also rebounding our markets. Seller beware when China is the main buyer.

The weekly ethanol grind was 294MGa and well above the weekly pace needed to meet the annual USDA estimate. Corn was seen as being 91% planted to start the week along with great weather across most of the US heading into Memorial Day weekend.

Via Barchart


Soybeans made small gains on the week with lower volatility than corn but similar price movement. Exports were solid in old crop beans giving the bulls some momentum to work with heading  into the weekend. Exports were strong again this week, which is a welcome sign after slowing the last couple. The soybean crop was seen as about 80% planted at the start of the week as progress continues across the country. The recent loses have made US commodities competitive again in the world market allowing for some stronger demand into the end of the year. Once we get on the other side of Memorial Day the June weather outlook will start to be important as most of the crop will be in the ground and some already well into growing.

Via Barchart

Dow Jones

The Dow and other indexes gained on the week with improving opening conditions and support for some of the major market players in the S&P. Republicans and Democrats continue to work on their versions of the infrastructure plan the Biden White House wants to pass.

Lumber

Check out our recent post about the lumber market and what all has been going on.

Podcast

Check out our recent podcast with Dr. Greg Willoughby: We’re talking with Greg in the new episode about being a “plant doctor”, weather patterns, GMO & organic produce, crop history, technical advances, level 201 education on agronomy, the agronomy equation, Helena Agri, soil biology, American v European agriculture, Greg’s early background in livestock, and the advancement of native plants to modern produce.

https://rcmagservices.com/the-hedged-edge/

US Drought Monitor

The map below shows this week’s drought conditions across the US. Many areas across the corn belt received rain over the week while others, like the Dakotas and Michigan, remain dry.

Via Barchart