Category: Market Updates

28 Nov 2022

THE LEONARD LUMBER REPORT: AT THIS POINT IT’S TIME TO KEEP IT SIMPLE

Weekly Lumber Recap 

11/27/22

At this point it’s time to keep it simple. I remember the quote from Ronald Reagan about the cold war. He said, “let’s keep it simple. We win they lose.” Today we don’t have a road map. We don’t have historical data. All we have is the market in front of us. The data indicates a market headed for $300 while the real fear is it goes up $300. Both are a reality. Without a supply disruption the market is geared for a slow erosion with light rallies in between. Any signs of fear from the buyside and the mills will be off the market again.

Most would agree that housing is in a created recession. That is a recession caused by a steep increase in prices. Whether those price increases were cost related or not, it has the same effect at the end of the day. The only question is how deep of a recession the US go into. A layoff panic will drag housing into a deeper recession. A recession with minimal layoffs will allow the market to find a level and build off of it. The bad news it may take until the 2nd quarter to see how bad it could be.

Today the futures market is at a standstill. It is drifting lower with the cash market. The January futures contract has had a $38 trading range in November so far. There are three days left but nevertheless that is the smallest range in years. All the pressure in futures comes from the electronic trade made up of either the algo or the funds. The industry has pared its inventory to a level that hedging is not necessary. That is friendly. Any disruption in supply sets off the panic beginning with the funds covering shorts. That is where the big run-up would come from.

From a technical standpoint the market is close to a move. The Bollinger bands are as tight as we have seen in months. The sideways trade has pushed the market into an area calling for a breakout. A strike will set things off to the upside. A .75 raise in December will probably cause the bottom to drop out. In either case the futures market wants to trend. I’m still a fan of mitigating upside risk. The downside is easy.

NEW CONTRACT:

Lumber Futures Volume & Open Interest

https://www.cmegroup.com/markets/agriculture/lumber-and-softs/lumber.volume.html?itm_source=cmegroup&itm_medium=friendly&itm_campaign=lbr&redirect=/lbr

CFTC Commitments of Traders Long Report

https://www.cftc.gov/dea/futures/other_lf.htm

Lumber & Wood Pulp Options

https://www.cmegroup.com/daily_bulletin/current/Section23_Lumber_Options.pdf

About the Leonard Report:

The Leonard Lumber Report is a column that focuses on the lumber futures market’s highs and lows and everything else in between. Our very own, Brian Leonard, risk analyst, will provide weekly commentary on the industry’s wood product sectors.

 

Brian Leonard

bleonard@rcmam.com

312-761-2636

21 Nov 2022

THE LEONARD LUMBER REPORT: With this abrupt pause in our industry it may be a good time to do a review of 2022 and projections for 2023

Weekly Lumber Recap 

11/20/22

With this abrupt pause in our industry it may be a good time to do a review of 2022 and projections for 2023. The reason for an early start is that any movement from here will be the result of first quarter planning. There are three focus areas that will drive prices. The first is the decline in demand and new forward guidance. Next is the cost of production and lastly is the equilibrium equation. Let’s go last to first.

I now call the equilibrium equation a numerical defense. The focus in the last decade was just how underbuilt the housing industry had become. I call it a numerical defense because we continue to use an old formula to get this rather high number. It is based on a husband, wife, two kids and a dog. That isn’t the typical household today, so the underbuilt number is high. In the mid 2000’s we took starts up to 1.6 because of spec buying. If fell to 500 once the spec homes were empty and for sale. This recent hysterical run was fueled by 401K borrowing or buying among other factors. The point I am making is that at 7% mortgages and a 385K starter we are overbuilt.

Next is the cost of production. Does anyone think it could be in the $400’s? Nope. We are all looking at a $600 number. I know I am and can defend that number. That is for 2×4 2&B spruce. I think the entire basket of products may just be cheaper in some respects than we think. A good example is SYP. 10 years ago, that would not play into the mix as much as it does today. The cost of production is a non-defined factor in pricing today. It will be dragged into it eventually, but for today a mill trading spruce under $400 speaks volumes.

Finally, another difficult statistic to follow is demand and construction. We are seeing the expected push in building for yearend. The builders are getting it done while also looking for at least a 30% drop in construction for the first half of the year. This strategy to build and then abruptly stop seems counter intuitive. They are increasing available homes in a falling demand market. What this will do is extend the period of easing until the excesses are cleaned up. It isn’t an economic strategy but more of an accounting move. My first thought is to be careful of the home builder stocks in the short run.

The expectation from here is to look for the shock to the system that turns the market. Until the market experiences it the trade will be one of floating into a buy round that lasts for three days or two weeks. In either case new lows can follow. This market remarkably looks like the lumber market of old. Can that be possible?

NEW CONTRACT:

Lumber Futures Volume & Open Interest

https://www.cmegroup.com/markets/agriculture/lumber-and-softs/lumber.volume.html?itm_source=cmegroup&itm_medium=friendly&itm_campaign=lbr&redirect=/lbr

CFTC Commitments of Traders Long Report

https://www.cftc.gov/dea/futures/other_lf.htm

Lumber & Wood Pulp Options

https://www.cmegroup.com/daily_bulletin/current/Section23_Lumber_Options.pdf

 

About the Leonard Report:

The Leonard Lumber Report is a column that focuses on the lumber futures market’s highs and lows and everything else in between. Our very own, Brian Leonard, risk analyst, will provide weekly commentary on the industry’s wood product sectors.

 

Brian Leonard

bleonard@rcmam.com

312-761-2636

18 Nov 2022

AG MARKET UPDATE: NOVEMBER 4 – 18

Corn strung together several days lower in a row last week with a neutral USDA report in the middle of it. The USDA raised the US yield to 172.3, which was within the range of estimates. While corn had been trading sideways for some time, the move lower remained in its trading range, followed by a bounce back higher this week. The black sea export corridor deal being renewed is welcome news for the world supply chain. Brazil and Argentina got some needed rain while some dry areas missed out. They are still suffering drought conditions, but it is also still early in the year. Exports improved this week from last, as the current price levels attract buyers.

Via Barchart

Soybeans fell over the last two weeks, due to two days of large losses this week. Soybean Oil got hit as world veg oil prices fell, pulling beans down with it. The rain in Argentina helped speed up soybean planting but rain will still be needed moving forward as still about 25% of the country experiences drought. Bean exports, like corn, improved and better than expected this week. The lack of news makes this a difficult market to trade in as there are no overwhelming bullish or bearish factors dictating direction.

Via Barchart

The US cotton supply was raised in last week’s USDA report with better yields and lower demand. The problem in the cotton market right now is demand. While more money is being spent , fewer units are being bought which translates to less consumption. With the continued high energy prices and inflation issues across the world people are prioritizing eating and heating their homes and fueling their cars (good call) over buying new clothes. The potential for a looming world recession in 2023 does not ease demand concerns as we would not see demand for cotton pick up as producers would sit on inventory they currently have. Until we get more clarity on the world outlook and 2023 it is a time to be cautious. The weakening USD will be worth keeping an eye on.

Via Barchart

Equity Markets

The equity markets started off November with gains after a cooler than expected October CPI of 7.7%. While a drop is nice to see it is important to remember the target is 2-3% so we are still much closer to the top than the bottom with a Fed rate rise coming in early December. The markets seem to expect a 50-point hike, but there is still plenty of time for that to change and get priced in before. One big question that remains for the markets looking ahead is “what will December bring?”. Will there be a Santa Clause rally? Will markets fall as investors do some tax loss harvesting? Many investors still think a recession is coming in 2023 and the next month and half could give us a better idea what to expect.

Via Barchart

Drought Monitor

Podcast

The Hedged Edge is back online with a guest who could be this podcast’s most important guest of all time. At a time when inflation is running rampant through the world economy, drought conditions are drying up our rivers, and the global supply of grain is scarce. We are tasked with the question, “what the hell is going on in logistics, and is there any relief in sight?”

To help address these questions and more, I am joined today by a man that needs no introduction to most in the physical commodity sector – Woodson Dunavant with the Dunavant Logistics company based in Memphis, TN.

Via Barchart.com

 

Contact an Ag Specialist Today

Whether you’re a producer, end-user, commercial operator, RCM AG Services helps protect revenues and control costs through its suite of hedging tools and network of buyers/sellers — Contact Ag Specialist Brady Lawrence today at 312-858-4049 or blawrence@rcmam.com.

 

14 Nov 2022

THE LEONARD LUMBER REPORT: TODAY YOU CAN’T LOOK AT THE HOUSING MARKET OR THE LUMBER INDUSTRY WITHOUT LOOKING AT THE MACROECONOMY

Weekly Lumber Recap 

11/13/22

Today you can’t look at the housing market or the lumber industry without looking at the macroeconomy. There are no longer sectors, but one big unit of trade and we are married to that fact for a while. Thursday the markets reacted favorable to a better that expected CPI. Equities went higher and rates fell. The best quote I heard was that the market can finally see a bottom. It isn’t close but can be seen. What that means is that we know there will be a bump in layoffs. There probably will be a few companies that go under, but that is all part of the fix. Since the housing industry has such a long timeline new construction planning could be on the horizon. The industry can handle higher rates if in place and expected. A break in home prices will bring about a market again. Low home inventories, less supply of wood, no inventories in the field these are all positives. Things will slowly get better unless there is a blowup, and the fact is that rising rates breaks something. It always happens. Could that be bitcoin?

A $38 billion company with ties to hundreds of firm’s files for bankruptcy. The CEO says, “sorry my bad.” WTF…. I’m not sure that is enough to shake the entire global economy but will do some damage to many sectors from advertising to net worth of a generation. The generation we need to buy homes. It is too early to tell how much damage was done.

This downturn will take time to play out. Prices have to come down. These high prices for homes are unsustainable. With all this wait and see we could expect a sideways lumber market for some time. Rallies will come from a buy round followed by the slow pull back. The buys are only a temporary fix for the mills. They can’t build momentum off of them. Out in the trade price isn’t the driving factor. It is more based on need and as we have seen there isn’t much difference between $430 and $530 if it is needed.

Buy January calls and take the rest of the year off….

NEW CONTRACT:

Lumber Futures Volume & Open Interest

https://www.cmegroup.com/markets/agriculture/lumber-and-softs/lumber.volume.html?itm_source=cmegroup&itm_medium=friendly&itm_campaign=lbr&redirect=/lbr

CFTC Commitments of Traders Long Report

https://www.cftc.gov/dea/futures/other_lf.htm

Lumber & Wood Pulp Options

https://www.cmegroup.com/daily_bulletin/current/Section23_Lumber_Options.pdf

 

About the Leonard Report:

The Leonard Lumber Report is a column that focuses on the lumber futures market’s highs and lows and everything else in between. Our very own, Brian Leonard, risk analyst, will provide weekly commentary on the industry’s wood product sectors.

 

Brian Leonard

bleonard@rcmam.com

312-761-2636

07 Nov 2022

THE LEONARD LUMBER REPORT: 11 straight weeks of a trading range between $430 and $550

Weekly Lumber Recap 

11/6/22

It has been 11 straight weeks of a trading range between $430 and $550. I have been able to cover virtually every negative or positive effecting this industry during that time. What we do know today is that single family homes are no longer affordable which will show in the data at some point. On the multifamily side there continues to be very profitable sales and/or rentals. Given those two points the question becomes how much wood needs to be taken out of the market before it reaches equilibrium. Let’s rehash some of the key points to see if any are indicators yet.

The builders are going to lock it down going into 2023. That is a given. I am seeing indications that the buy side is already gearing up for it. There is no building of inventories. It is a buy as needed cycle. With prices going down, it is a simple and efficient process. Just remember a zero inventory policy when construction isn’t dead sometimes backfires but in any case it will keep things lean. To sum it up, we are looking for a falloff in starts and a general zero inventory policy.

Supply will be curtailed. There will be continued moderate reductions. I expect to see less Euro as they work through the winter. I still expect to see a pickup in China. They have not been in the market for a very long time. Finally, we always have rail disruptions from the possible strike in a few weeks to winter issues. There will be less wood in the system.

The problems today are all the unknown’s. This is driving the zero inventory policy in the US. Someone said it well Friday when she mentioned that the Fed is “burning growth.” To be clear they are slowing down an overheated economy. An economy that they overheated. This back and forth will cause something to break. If the only thing to break is housing then we are close to being done. If there is more we will feel that effect.

The trade has many unknowns and stuck in a range. This upcoming week has the election and probably news of preparations for a possible strike. It’s hard to be short futures but I don’t expect to see much cash activity because of it.

Buy January calls and take the rest of the year off….

NEW CONTRACT:

Lumber Futures Volume & Open Interest

https://www.cmegroup.com/markets/agriculture/lumber-and-softs/lumber.volume.html?itm_source=cmegroup&itm_medium=friendly&itm_campaign=lbr&redirect=/lbr

CFTC Commitments of Traders Long Report

https://www.cftc.gov/dea/futures/other_lf.htm

Lumber & Wood Pulp Options

https://www.cmegroup.com/daily_bulletin/current/Section23_Lumber_Options.pdf

 

About the Leonard Report:

The Leonard Lumber Report is a column that focuses on the lumber futures market’s highs and lows and everything else in between. Our very own, Brian Leonard, risk analyst, will provide weekly commentary on the industry’s wood product sectors.

 

Brian Leonard

bleonard@rcmam.com

312-761-2636

04 Nov 2022

AG MARKET UPDATE: OCTOBER 21 – NOVEMBER 4

Corn had small losses on the week again as it has been range bound the last month. The market holding at this level certainly is not a bad thing when it traded $1 lower than current levels in July, it just needs a catalyst to push it one way or the other. The catalyst could be next week’s USDA Report as there could always be a surprise or two for the market. Many estimates see the USDA raising production from the October estimates, but by how much will be the question.  Ultimately with US harvest coming to a close and South America ramping up, the global outlook and weather will begin to dominate the markets. The US will also need plenty of moisture over the coming weeks and winter to 1. Raise river levels to help grain exports and 2. Improve subsoil moisture heading into 2023. Exports remain underwhelming and will likely be lowered for the year in next week’s report.

Via Barchart

Unlike Corn, Beans have had a much wider range after an initial flat start to harvest have rallied back hard over the past 2 weeks. This move higher is welcome and appears to be heading toward a test of the highs from early September – can it break through?  The USDA report will be the big news next week along with any news out of South America for weather and China potentially coming out of zero covid restrictions. Like corn, the USDA will likely raise US production next week and may lower exports. For any sustained move higher China will need to be a regular buyer and South American conditions would need to become less favorable.

Via Barchart

Cotton has had quite the week with 4 days that traded limit up at one point. With a lot of speculative positions in the market being short, this could be seen as a short covering rally as specs must exit their positions before expiration. On the physical side, the global cash market is a mess. Mills have massive inventories of both cotton and converted goods with no companies buying. The lack of buying by apparel companies shows their concern for the holiday season as inflation and market uncertainty will weigh on spending this year.

Via Barchart

Equity Markets

The equity markets have gained over the last 2 weeks; however, gains were muted after the Fed raised rates another 75 points earlier this week. This was expected but the comments by chair Powell after they came out were more hawkish than expected setting up an interesting point in next month’s meeting. Powell said the Fed is not likely to slow down yet setting up the potential for another 75 points in December, while analysts were leaning towards 50 before he spoke. The unemployment rate did tick higher in October while many companies also announced hiring freezes and grim outlooks for the first half of 2023. Crude oil spiked back above $90 a barrel on Friday continuing to bolster energy stocks. Midterm elections next week will also be closely watched as it may lay out what, if anything, will be done over the next 2 years.

Via Barchart

Drought Monitor

Podcast

Are the Fed’s hikes starting to dampen inflation? Oil, grains, and metals have all fallen from their highs. But the rarely spoken of Cotton market was one of the first to crack…falling from 1.58/lb to 0.95/lb in just a few short days. We’re digging into this sharp drop and just why and how Cotton is involved in seemingly everything with RCM’s very own cotton king, LOGIC advisors Ron Lawson.

In this episode, Ron is giving us the low down on how and why he believes it’s not Dr. Copper which acts as the global economic barometer, but how Cotton is the real Canary and leading indicator on global demand. In between those talks, we’re covering all things Cotton including crop insurance, irrigated vs dry land, the scam that was Pima and Egyptian Cotton, the process of cotton – which countries have it, which want it, ginning it, spinning it, dyeing it, global commodity merchant co’s pushing it around, and even micro-plastics, climate change, and how Cotton always flows to the cheapest labor source. Finally, we’re walking in some high Cotton putting Ron in the hot seat. Will we ever get the growth back? Tune in to get these critical hot takes — SEND IT!

Via Barchart.com

 

Contact an Ag Specialist Today

Whether you’re a producer, end-user, commercial operator, RCM AG Services helps protect revenues and control costs through its suite of hedging tools and network of buyers/sellers — Contact Ag Specialist Brady Lawrence today at 312-858-4049 or blawrence@rcmam.com.

31 Oct 2022

THE LEONARD LUMBER REPORT: THE KEY TAKEAWAY FOR THE WEEK WAS A FALLING FUTURES MARKET AT A TIME WHEN THE SHORT FUNDS WERE COVERING

Weekly Lumber Recap 

10/30/22

The key takeaway for the week was a falling futures market at a time when the short funds were covering. The quietness in the cash market was the feature. We are seeing a sharp drop in open interest as the funds exit. While expected it still is worrisome to not see any support from it. What is apparent is the fact that the industry is in drift mode. It is a buy only what you need market. No one can project what impact the rates doubling in 6 months is going to have on the entire industry. This guarded tempo is warranted. If this last rally was caused by the election bubble we expected then it could be a long cold winter. Let’s look at a few issues.

This is an industry with rapidly changing dynamics. The key driver is the Fed. We know they are out to slow the housing market and will do a good job of it. What we are now watching is the big ones. The first indication of a slowdown is liquidity. Most believe that something needs to blow up but that isn’t the case here. What we will see is companies looking inward and slowing most activity. This is the quiet bleed. The other major issue will be when companies start to put the “lists” together for layoffs. This is really the telltale sign. It took almost 15 years to get labor back to a stable level and now they may have to let people go. So, at this point we expect a liquidity crunch followed by layoffs. So that’s the macro picture. What is the micro picture?

As said earlier, we may have pulled forward business expected from the election bubble. We have seen a draw down in inventories to a level that keeps the trade in the market. Granted housing is eroding but the on-hand inventory will always be limited. I did expect to see much better basis business in the last few weeks. What we saw was a very big push back to build inventories or make margin calls. This looks like a one up and three weeks down marketplace. Those are very tradable. Going into next week I think there are three dynamics to watch. The first is that rates have doubled in 6 months and are now called to level off and hold through 2025. That’s not a typo. Next is expectations. Forward-looking reports indicate a slowing of both production and demand. 2023 could look a lot like 2019 as far as the trade goes. Is 402 the low? Lastly is the housing market itself. Some are calling it a meltdown, but it looks too busy to me to call it that. This looks more like a bear market that trades. Use the sell offs to own cheap wood for next year.

NEW CONTRACT:

Lumber Futures Volume & Open Interest

https://www.cmegroup.com/markets/agriculture/lumber-and-softs/lumber.volume.html?itm_source=cmegroup&itm_medium=friendly&itm_campaign=lbr&redirect=/lbr

CFTC Commitments of Traders Long Report

https://www.cftc.gov/dea/futures/other_lf.htm

Lumber & Wood Pulp Options

https://www.cmegroup.com/daily_bulletin/current/Section23_Lumber_Options.pdf

 

About the Leonard Report:

The Leonard Lumber Report is a column that focuses on the lumber futures market’s highs and lows and everything else in between. Our very own, Brian Leonard, risk analyst, will provide weekly commentary on the industry’s wood product sectors.

 

Brian Leonard

bleonard@rcmam.com

312-761-2636

24 Oct 2022

THE LEONARD LUMBER REPORT: Another Positive Week With Futures Adding Another $45

Weekly Lumber Recap 

10/23/22

It was another positive week with futures adding another $45. That’s a run of $148 from low too high in 16 sessions. The first takeaway is that historically lumber liked 16-day cycles so it could be nearing its end. The other takeaway would be the fact that the futures market has only rallied $148. Yes, after hitting a low not seen since June of 2020, one would think it deserved more. The question is if this is a one-time cash buy or if there can be more? I’ll take two looks at the question.

First is the cycle. This cycle has a much better dynamic than the ones seen for the past 6 months. Two weeks ago, the buyer was able to buy cash and flip it in almost the same day. That is typical. The difference in this cycle is if a next buy round occurs the buyer will have a premium futures market to lean on. There is an out. That is something we haven’t seen in a long time. That might be just enough to generate more cash buying. It did in the past, I’m just worried the headwinds will keep most out.

The other and most difficult part of this industry is the gap in value from today till next month. There has always been a gap of some sorts but today many are worried that what they buy today will have no value down the road. It is a very real problem. We have already experienced it in 2022 and 2021. There was a time when a product didn’t hold anywhere near the value it was bought at. With today’s uncertainties most don’t want to be caught in it. That will probably limit the next buy round once the needs are filled in regardless of the futures premium.

Another issue I would like to touch upon is the economic future. There is a constant barrage of economic data hitting us daily. It is all over the prediction scale. I want to go back to an analysis I sent out a few years ago about money and housing. There is a lot of data using the last few recessions to gauge how this one will look. I have to warn you that this will be the first recession since the late 70’s/early 80’s that won’t have money thrown at it. Since 1987 every slowdown has had money push into the system. This recession could be ugly. The one caveat is that just possibly we have pushed enough into it, pre-recession, to be an offset. That didn’t help the Roman Empire but just maybe it can help us. This industry will be back on its heels for months. It will probably take until the second quarter to get a clear picture of housing. That doesn’t necessarily tell us not to hold inventory……

NEW CONTRACT:

Lumber Futures Volume & Open Interest

https://www.cmegroup.com/markets/agriculture/lumber-and-softs/lumber.volume.html

CFTC Commitments of Traders Long Report

https://www.cftc.gov/dea/futures/other_lf.htm

Lumber & Wood Pulp Options

https://www.cmegroup.com/daily_bulletin/current/Section23_Lumber_Options.pdf

About the Leonard Report:

The Leonard Lumber Report is a column that focuses on the lumber futures market’s highs and lows and everything else in between. Our very own, Brian Leonard, risk analyst, will provide weekly commentary on the industry’s wood product sectors.

 

Brian Leonard

bleonard@rcmam.com

312-761-2636

21 Oct 2022

AG MARKET UPDATE: OCTOBER 14 – 21

Corn had small losses on the week as harvest continues to roll on. The major ongoing story is the low river levels impacting barge travel along the Mississippi and other major water ways. This is having an impact on basis levels along with exports. Exports for the week were within estimates and ethanol output got back above 1 million barrels for the first time since early August. The exports will be the main factor to keep an eye on in the short term with no immediate relief expected for the Mississippi River with barges backed up and delays on both sides of the supply chain. The drought conditions compared to this time last year can be seen at the bottom, showing how much moisture is needed over the winter.

Via Barchart

Beans made gains this week with China showing back up as buyers but still has a bearish outlook with South America expecting neutral weather. Harvest continues to roll on with 63% done and nothing slowing it down. As always, the US needs to sell their beans before Brazil gets closer to harvest, with a potentially record crop coming from Brazil this year. If China continues to buy and Brazil begins to have weather issues, we could see a rally, but the Mississippi river issues and other bearish problems may have the upper hand currently.

Via Barchart

Equity Markets

The equity markets were positive again this week with mixed earnings and option expiration pushing markets higher. Next week’s earnings will be the most important and set the tone for the rest of the year with Apple, Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Exxon, Visa, Facebook, and many more. The guidance these company’s give will show where the largest companies in the world see the economy in the next 3-12 months. While this month’s trade has been encouraging, many investors think is just a pause before we move lower again, next week may give us a better idea. Mortgage rates topped 7% again this week as the housing market continues to face the fallout.

Via Barchart

Drought Monitor

The drought monitor below shows where we stand compared to this time last year.

October 18, 2022 Valid 8 a.m. EDT (Released Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022)

October 19, 2021 Valid 8 a.m. EDT (Released Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021)

Podcast

Are the Fed’s hikes starting to dampen inflation? Oil, grains, and metals have all fallen from their highs. But the rarely spoken of Cotton market was one of the first to crack…falling from 1.58/lb to 0.95/lb in just a few short days. We’re digging into this sharp drop and just why and how Cotton is involved in seemingly everything with RCM’s very own cotton king, LOGIC advisors Ron Lawson.

In this episode, Ron is giving us the low down on how and why he believes it’s not Dr. Copper which acts as the global economic barometer, but how Cotton is the real Canary and leading indicator on global demand. In between those talks, we’re covering all things Cotton including crop insurance, irrigated vs dry land, the scam that was Pima and Egyptian Cotton, the process of cotton – which countries have it, which want it, ginning it, spinning it, dyeing it, global commodity merchant co’s pushing it around, and even micro-plastics, climate change, and how Cotton always flows to the cheapest labor source. Finally, we’re walking in some high Cotton putting Ron in the hot seat. Will we ever get the growth back? Tune in to get these critical hot takes — SEND IT!

Via Barchart.com

 

Contact an Ag Specialist Today

Whether you’re a producer, end-user, commercial operator, RCM AG Services helps protect revenues and control costs through its suite of hedging tools and network of buyers/sellers — Contact Ag Specialist Brady Lawrence today at 312-858-4049 or blawrence@rcmam.com.

 

14 Oct 2022

AG MARKET UPDATE: OCTOBER 7 – 14

The USDA report this week did not make any major changes to the US corn crop estimating a yield of 171.9 bushels per acres, down .6 bu/ac from September. The lack of surprises in the report kept corn trading along its path of late with no major losses or gains. The ending stocks were raised on lower demand with a high USD and world recession fears looming. While the balance sheets remain tight for corn but the recession fears lowering demand eases the balance sheet worries, for now. Harvest is still rolling along with much of the US experiencing drought conditions and no major rains in the forecast for many areas to slow it down much.

Via Barchart

Beans were the surprise of the report with estimated yields falling to 49.8 bu/ac, down 0.7 bu/ac from the September report. US ending stocks were also cut with the yield lowering getting an appropriate reaction higher aster the report. The main concern for beans right now is low demand and the potential of a record Brazil bean crop. The strong USD weighs on bean exports with China being slow buyers, as we have said before to start feeling better about the direction of beans’ price, we need China to show up more often in larger quantities.

Via Barchart

Cotton continued lower this week following the USDA report that saw a bearish reaction despite lower production estimates. Cotton is still fighting the supply vs demand issue to figure out where to go. Right now, the demand, or lack thereof, is winning as prices have been moving lower over the last 2 months. World recession fears impact the demand for cotton with lower demand balancing the lower production. The lack of demand makes it difficult to see a sizeable move higher in the near term but for cotton to be planted in areas that could grow corn and soybeans these price levels will not be attractive. We could potentially see a sideways trade until there is more certainty economically (demand) going forward.

Via Barchart

Equity Markets

The equity markets were positive this week due to a massive rally on Thursday to gain back the week’s losses and some. Inflation came in hot, again, this week giving the Fed the go ahead to raise rates another 75 basis points in November if they want to with a 15% chance of a 100 point raise. The market rallied on the CPI number, despite it being high, showing that there is still room for bounces in a bear market. It is hard to find much good news in the market with the proposed deal between the Biden administration and Rail workers unions falling apart this week as well, bringing the possibility of shutdowns back.

Via Barchart

Drought Monitor

The drought monitor below shows where we stand week to week. As you can see much of the country is in drought conditions and will need moisture over the winter.

Podcast

Are the Fed’s hikes starting to dampen inflation? Oil, grains, and metals have all fallen from their highs. But the rarely spoken of Cotton market was one of the first to crack…falling from 1.58/lb to 0.95/lb in just a few short days. We’re digging into this sharp drop and just why and how Cotton is involved in seemingly everything with RCM’s very own cotton king, LOGIC advisors Ron Lawson.

In this episode, Ron is giving us the low down on how and why he believes it’s not Dr. Copper which acts as the global economic barometer, but how Cotton is the real Canary and leading indicator on global demand. In between those talks, we’re covering all things Cotton including crop insurance, irrigated vs dry land, the scam that was Pima and Egyptian Cotton, the process of cotton – which countries have it, which want it, ginning it, spinning it, dyeing it, global commodity merchant co’s pushing it around, and even micro-plastics, climate change, and how Cotton always flows to the cheapest labor source. Finally, we’re walking in some high Cotton putting Ron in the hot seat. Will we ever get the growth back? Tune in to get these critical hot takes — SEND IT!

Via Barchart.com

Contact an Ag Specialist Today

Whether you’re a producer, end-user, commercial operator, RCM AG Services helps protect revenues and control costs through its suite of hedging tools and network of buyers/sellers — Contact Ag Specialist Brady Lawrence today at 312-858-4049 or blawrence@rcmam.com.