Tag: soybeans

28 Aug 2020

AG MARKETS UPDATE: AUGUST 22 – 28

Corn saw solid gains on the week as large exports and continued weather problems were the market movers. The western corn belt looks to continue its dry run in the coming week with no widespread rain expected in areas that have been suffering from drought. This will put more strain on the crop as we head into harvest. The crop, especially in Iowa on top of the storm damage, has been fighting drought conditions most of the summer in the western corn belt so an already strained crop doesn’t look like it will get much help coming down the stretch. Large exports this week also helped give a boost as China is stepping up their purchases over the past month. Along with the rally in Dec ’20 prices the ’21 crop has gotten a boost as well to much more attractive levels than a few weeks ago. The chart below shows the rebound back to levels we last saw around the 4th of July. It is possible we have already put in a low heading into harvest as weather outlooks, crop conditions and exports have been favorable for prices as of late. Unfortunately favorable for prices does not usually mean favorable for the crop so hope exports continue because any good weather news to help the crops would be bearish for prices.

Via Barchart

 


Soybeans saw a major bounce this week as weather concerns and Chinese buying drove the market. As soybean yields are still at a higher risk than corn at this point in the year the dry weather outlook could cause some damage to the crop. Like corn, the areas already in drought conditions will continue to hurt along with areas that have just started struggling look to continue into September. The continued exports to China are promising as consistent buying in bulk would be promising of long term Chinese demand. As everyone likes to see prices going higher for this year after a long year of Covid-19 and weather, do not forget to be thinking about the ’21 prices if the rally continues where you could sell forward some of your production for ‘21 or gain some premium for storing until next summer. If China continues making purchases and the weather remains grim look for this rally to continue or hold until there is news to stop it.


Via Barchart

 

Hurricane Laura
Hurricane Laura slammed the gulf coast in eastern Texas and western Louisiana as a category 4 storm. The hurricane will bring 5-10 inches of rain and heavy winds to the western Mississippi Valley. As the storm is expected to turn northeast and dump rains on the southern Ohio Valley this weekend it will miss the areas that need the rain the most in the western corn belt. Seeing the destruction brought by the storm along the coast our thoughts and prayers are with everyone affected. (Check out some more thoughts on a hurricanes effect on futures markets from our sister company here)   

21 Aug 2020

Ag Markets Update: August 15 – 21

Corn stayed level on the week after last week’s rally from the storm damage. Pro Farmer Tour is on the road this week looking at several areas across the midwest. The markets will be keeping an eye on them as they try and assess the damage of the storm and how many bushels were lost as well as the potential yields in areas not affected by the storm. So far the PFT has shown better than expected yield potential for Ohio, Indiana, Nebraska and the Dakotas. The parts of Iowa and Illinois to miss the storm look strong as well but storm damage is ultimately what people are holding their breathe for. Parts of western Iowa that were not affected by the storm have had another problem of their own, a severe drought that is going to cost the area bushels as well. All eyes and ears will be on the PFT as they try and estimate how many acres/bushels were lost to the derecho; more than expected expect another small rally, less than expected we could see another retreat as we head into harvest season.

 

Soybeans saw a small boost this week as China continues to be a major buyer. PFT is also looking at beans and making estimates based off pod counts so that has been a market mover this week as well. Bean pod count numbers are running well ahead of last year and historical averages, which indicates the bean crop still has above trend line potential which is bearish at these levels after the recent 54-cent rally. Several areas are in need of rain as well in the next 10-14 day window that look relatively dry for most areas continuing the trend of the past couple of weeks. At this stage beans still have plenty of ways to go to get to harvest ready so keeping an eye on them as August comes to a close will be important as well as always keeping an eye on export numbers.

 

Cotton prices gained on the week as strong exports and the concern of the possibility of a tropical storm in the gulf grew. West Texas has already had many weather issues, but the south has had a good year so far for growing but a storm with strong winds could change that. China was the biggest buyer of cotton on this weeks export report with 13 total buyers. This is promising as it would appear that other countries demand is beginning to come back after a summer of shutdowns has kept exports low. The US dollar continues to struggle providing some support for US commodities on the world stage. Continue keeping an eye on China as more rains continue to affect the Yangtze River as it reached new record water levels this week. The US and PRC look to continue trade talks in the coming days so expect any news, positive or negative, to affect the market.

 

Via Barchart.com

10 Aug 2020

Ag Markets Update: August 1 – 7

Corn took it on the chin this week, again, as crop conditions and weather forecasts continue to point toward the potential of a record yield. With strong conditions and weather moving forward, most of the corn belt, with the exception of parts of Iowa suffering from severe drought, are running out of time for many weather factors to effect the crop. Keeping an eye on forecasts for Ohio and Michigan will be important to farmers as they could use some rain in those areas but are not desperate, yet. If the forecast continues to look promising there is not much bullish news out there to help find support with a 180 bpa crop still in play. Keep an eye on exports as we continue to see strong export numbers but little positive price reaction as a product of it. Yield estimates range from 178-183 bpa from what we have seen from across the spectrum, showing that many top experts believe a record yield could be seen this year.

Soybeans had a tough week like corn because high yields are still very much in play on top of already strong stocks. Without China ramping up their purchases to try and at least act like they are trying to reach the Phase 1 Trade Agreement; beans are running into a demand problem. Bean yields are looking to potentially be 52+ bpa with a 73% G/E rating this week saw prices take a hit. Beans and corn have been moving lower over the last few weeks as few weather issues and no large surprises in demand have come to fruition. Any problem that China has with the Three Gorges Dam area could lead to more purchases but a total failure of the dam would be a disaster as it could cause a massive loss of life along with flooding of large areas of farmland.

Cotton has seen a boost this week as it, like other raw materials have seen a boost as demand around the world starts to come back. Another supportive factor for cotton has been the continued decline in the value of the US Dollar. The threat of Hurricane Isaias effecting the crop in the SE helped give a boost early in the week but how much damage it actually did to the crop remains to be seen. If prices can breach and stay above 65 cents that would be a good level of support.

Phase 1 Trade Agreement Meeting
The US and China are set to have their first check-in meeting to assess how Phase 1 is going (spoiler alert: not great). This is on top of recent tensions over the closing of embassies and spying allegations. Not sure that anything good can actually come out of these talks but they will be worth keeping an eye on August 15th. Hopefully we see a commitment to ramp up and get a boost to start that week following.

Lumber
Lumber continues its upward trend to price levels we have not seen since 2018. Lumber is a commodity the is easily produced because of the sheer quantity of it available supply is not an issue to slow down consumption. As many purchases and contracts are done well in advance the demand has not wavered as much as the pipeline of getting it from A-Z has. In a volatile market like this, especially during this kind of positive run for price, nobody ever wants to call the top so looks like everyone may want to ride it out and see what happens.

17 Jul 2020

Ag Markets Update: July 11 – 17

Despite one of the largest single export sales to China ever, prices for the week fell. After some welcome rains in the past week in areas that were dry, favorable outlook during pollination has the potential to help make this crop large. Ultimately, as yield potential continues to look high, big bumps in corn are looking slim unless there is a surprise in forecast changes or export sales. The crop conditions continue to look strong as you can see in the chart below. We are not near/at record conditions, but still have very strong numbers at this point in the year. A dip in condition would factor into price movement as well, but don’t don’t plan on that for a big boost towards the end of the month.


Soybeans had a flat week price-wise as steady sales continued to China and forecasts didn’t change too drastically. We started out the week with some prices drops, but a solid midweek bounce helped get back to flat as we head into the weekend. Look for any big forecast changes or unexpected purchases to be the only thing to move bean prices in the near future. As world demand has seen an uptick, the U.S. may find more buyers as South America has been so busy selling up to this point, they may have trouble fulfilling any additional large exports.

 

Large purchases from China gave Wheat a big boost halfway into the week. Wheat did have to give a good chunk of that boost back the following day due to a lack of confirmation on purchases, but any Chinese purchases at this point are beneficial to the markets as other Wheat growing countries are seeing lower yield numbers. As you can see below, markets are well off the lows that we set a few weeks back as Wheat has made a solid rebound. Just like with Soybeans, more confirmed purchases, or any purchases for that matter, would be beneficial to U.S. Wheat.

 

Dow Jones
The Dow saw positive numbers overall for the week with a few days of solid gains and small losses. Americans continue to keep their eyes on places that are reopening and spikes in major metropolitan areas. Retail spending was up +7.5% last month, but some experts think we may see that shrink as some states have rolled back their opening phases where cases have spiked. President Trump wants schools to open this fall as he sees that as a way to get more people back to work, so the rolling out of back-to-school plans be an important factor on the economy heading into election times.

02 Jul 2020

Ag Markets Update: June 27 – July 2

Corn finally got some positive news in the USDA report this week with planted acres coming in well below the March estimate and below the trade estimate. Planted acres came in 92.006 million which is about 5 million acres less than the estimate in March of 96.990 million. One thing of note from the USDA NASS Farm Labor survey that took place between May 30 and June 16, is that there was still 2.24 million acres of corn to be planted of the 92.006 million. This means that the acreage could still be lower if the entirety of that 2.24 million gets planted.  Even with the bullish acres news there was still some bearish news in the report when it came to the quarterly grain stocks report. Something that is also important to keep in mind that just because 92 million acres are planted does not mean there will be that many harvested. Even with a solid trend line yield north of 178, these acreage numbers should help. As always, keep an eye on exports and weather as the fundamental market movers in the short term.

Quickly touching on the weather outlook, there looks to be heat and dryness for the next couple of weeks in many areas. This will put some stress on the crop and this kind of forecast along with the USDA numbers from this week are the 2 catalyst moving corn higher.

Dec ’20 Chart

Via Barchart

Soybeans prices, like corn, saw a big bump from the NASS report, even though there wasn’t as much obvious bullish news from the acreage report. The acres did not change much from the March estimate of 83.510 million to 83.825 million acres. The trade estimate had it higher, trading at 84.716 million, which allowed for prices to jump up along with corn. Many people think that the acres are higher as a possible landing spot for those 5 million acres of corn that disappeared. Do not be surprised if we see more acres down the road. Soybeans in the long run still need as many exports to China as we can get going forward. The trend line yield of 50 bushels per acre is still in play with the start we have had but like mentioned above for corn the heat and dryness in the upcoming weeks could impact yield.

From speaking to farmers, it seems many farmers who planted in April and got washed out switched their acres from corn to soybeans. We are not sure how widespread this, is but don’t be surprised if soybean acres is higher when all is said and done.

Nov ’20 Chart

Via Barchart

Wheat got a boost out of the report just like corn and soybeans. Wheat’s gains came mostly as a result of following corn and beans higher as the report was not as bullish for wheat. Wheat acres were down 400,000 from the March estimates. It was welcome for wheat prices as they have been on a losing streak the last month as we look towards July for some help. If corn and soybeans continue to find support and prices go up look for wheat to be a benefactor of that as well.

Sep ’20 Chart

Via Barchart


The report was bullish for cotton as well as we have seen a rally because of it. Planted acres were down over 1.5 million acres from 13.703 million to 12.185 million acres. This is also down 11 percent from 2019. Cotton prices got a boost when these numbers came out as many acres were not planted due to a wet spring or prices being too low. Knowing the acreage number now moving forward weather in the major cotton areas will be important to keep an eye on. A tropical storm or drought, depending where, could cause cotton to jump like it has from this report.

Dec ’20 Chart

Via Barchart

Miscellaneous
Planted Acreage for principle crops dropped 7.2 million acres from the March report, 5 million of which came from corn. The big question is where did these acres go? We may see a lot go to prevent plant as only 3 million acres are estimated for PP but it is possible that a lot of acres were not planted because of depressed prices as a result of loses from the trade war the past couple years and the disruptions from COVID-19 pandemic all could be factors. Click here for the acreage report.

26 Jun 2020

AG Markets Update: June 22-26

 

Corn prices have taken a hit this week with Dec ’20 futures dipping below $3.30. Rains over the past week in the corn belt and warm temperatures will help support the crop along with rains and warm temps heading into the 4th of July. Exports continued their lackluster pace with no big sales to provide any supportive news. Tuesdays Stocks and Acreage report is the only place to look if you are looking for bullish news, but do not get your hopes up for a positive surprise from the USDA. The average trade estimate for US corn planted acres is sitting about 95 million acres which would be down from the March report of 96.99 million. With good weather forecast for pollination time keep an eye on if that changes as that would be a little supportive.

Via Barchart

 

Soybean prices took a hit this weak as no big sales were announced and growing tensions between the US and China. The administrations friction with China continues to escalate as Sec of State Pompeo is going on a full offensive to gather European support for more scrutiny of Chinese policies. The Soybean crop, like the corn, benefited from rains over the last week and will benefit from the forecast upcoming rains as well. Soybeans need the purchases from China to continue, if not accelerate, to have some bullish news. A mix of growing tensions with China and good US weather will continue to weigh on the market and should be the main things to keep an eye on going forward barring any surprises from the USDA report on Tuesday.

Via Barchart

 

DOW Jones

The Dow Jones took a big hit at the start of the week as cases begin to increase across the country in many states. As concerns of a larger “second wave” loom, markets may trade in this range until it seems we are out of the woods. The market will move on any vaccine news, news about US and China relations/trade war, and COVID-19 case numbers moving forward it seems unless the Fed comes out and does something.

Misc

As you can see from the prices below, aside from Corn, it was a relatively flat week for most other areas so the post is a little shorter this week. I wish there was more positive news out there about the markets but with everything that has happened this year and good weather there just isn’t much. It will be important to keep an eye on Sec Pompeo’s meetings with members of the EU as the week goes on.

 

Via Barchart

 

 

 

19 Jun 2020

AG MARKETS UPDATE: JUNE 13 – 19


The July corn price has slowly climbed up since the start of May, more of a crawl than a climb, but front month prices have moved up. The next month of weather will be really important for this years corn crop and decide what level of potential yields we could see. The next week looks to dump a lot of rain in the western corn belt which has had some really dry areas, and moderate amounts of rain in Illinois over to Ohio and throughout the SE. The combination of good weather and a lack of any serious exports does not bode well for corn prices. Farmdocdaily has projected future corn prices which we see as a very real possibility. A trend line yield is not good for prices at harvest time. This would be a great time to look at doing some HTAs with your elevator or hedging in your brokerage account because a >170 yield come harvest will lead to poor prices on top of poor basis in some areas (trading futures and options on futures are not suitable for all investors). It is important to also consider what government payments you have received and see how they will effect your ultimate price.


(Farmdocdaily)

 


Soybean prices gained a little bit this week but nothing too exciting. With another week of poor export sales, beans have been up on the week on rumors of Chinese buying despite no official confirmation from the USDA. Beans will move a little more independently as they will heavily rely on Chinese buying. The rumors of buying has gotten prices to this level, but big purchases and an effort to meet the Phase 1 trade deal would be very supportive for beans, even if the expected yield continues to be good. The June 30th Stocks and Acreage report will be very important to keep an eye on as well in the coming weeks to get a better idea of how big the corn and bean crops can actually be.

 

DOW Jones
The Dow Jones continues to try and erase the loss from last weeks major selloff. Continued new unemployment numbers came in Thursday with 1.5 million new unemployment claims. The economy is opening back up, but unemployment remains high as we continue to see the fallout of COVID-19 reach into the summer. Leveling positive rates and hospitalizations have many people wanting to move further on in their cities reopening plans but officials continue to warn about the possible second wave causing businesses to partially reopen (partial reopen=not as many jobs). Until there is a vaccine this will continue to be the major mover of the markets.

Lumber
Lumber has had a solid week in gains for the prices as a few factors hit the market. The cash market has picked up in the last week and mills have ramped up their production again. The market closed over the 100 DMA earlier this week breaking that technical resistance. Housing has begun to recover and a continued recovery would be welcome for demand.

 

12 Jun 2020

Ag Markets Update: June 6 – 12


The 2020 June USDA Crop Report came out Thursday and contained little surprise for the corn market. The report did trim off some ending stocks from 19/20 as they adjusted for the corn that was lost in ND that was never harvested until this spring due to weather problems. Corn seems to have little news to drive it significantly higher in the near term as there is favorable weather in most areas that have corn already growing. We should keep our eye on the lack of rain in the 7-14 day window as an early lack of rain could effect pollination in areas. The USDA put 20/21 corn price at $3.20, the same as last month, and $3.60 for 19/20. The stocks numbers can be found on the chart at the bottom but, like we said, little surprise. Funds continue to hold large short positions.

 


Soybean prices stayed steady this week after gains over the past couple of weeks. Continued confirmed Chinese buying along with sales to “unknown buyers”, more than likely China, have given beans the support they need. The buying has slowed down some but as long as decent purchases keep coming from China that will support soybeans. Like corn, the USDA report was pretty much a non-event for beans despite some bullish news. The ending world stocks for both 19/20 and 20/21 were both lowered enough to see some slight gains in bean prices before coming back down to finish trading Thursday about unchanged. The rally over the past couple weeks helped keep the bullish news from moving the markets much as most of the news seemed to be factored into the price already.

 


Wheat has had a hard week, losing over 20 cents in the July contract. The USDA report was definitely bearish for wheat as the outlook for the southern hemisphere 20/21 growing season was bigger. USDA is forecasting a 11 mmt gain in Australia wheat crop and 1.5 mmt gain for Argentina. There are some trade concerns that the Russian wheat crop may be trimmed which would allow for more US wheat exports. The demand for US wheat looks to be strong for the remainder of this year but when the southern hemisphere starts harvest the smaller demand for US wheat should pull prices down. In the short run keep an eye on any weather problems and trouble in Russia as US spring wheat is off to a great start with 82% rated good to excellent.

 


DOW Jones
The Dow Jones had a major selloff Thursday as concern over COVID-19 begins to ramp back up. Cases/hospitalizations in some places have started to go back up the last week. This could be a result of the easing of restrictions but many states who have been open are not showing major changes despite a small up trend in cases. The government earlier this week also admitted they made a mistake, shocking I know, when calculating last week’s unemployment rate. They have admitted they were off by 3% stating it should have been at 16.3% instead of the reported 13.3% that lead to a market rally.

Crude Oil
Crude took a hit on Thursday with the market selloff, as it fell over $3 a barrel. This comes as a result of similar reasons for the fall in the DOW Jones as consumer’ optimism about COVID-19 may be put on hold for a little bit. If consumers do not plan on travelling as much this summer and fall anymore and people continue to not go in the office consumer consumption will stay low.

05 Jun 2020

Ag Markets Update: May 30- June 5

Planting is close to done in most parts of the country with over 90% of corn in the ground. Now the focus will turn to weather as early growing season is an important time. With a tropical depression in the gulf, it makes it difficult to predict future weather patterns as they are constantly changing. One model predicts for a drought type pattern in the southern plains and western corn belt as the tropical storm Cristobal pulls a lot of energy, so we’ll see how that pans out. Corn prices have been steady the past few weeks with few purchases to get excited about and no early problems to the U.S. corn crop. As long as yield estimates for U.S. corn stays high, there does not seem to be many reasons for a rally unless there is a weather event or we start to see large purchases. Ethanol production has remained steady as reserves are starting to go down, which will hopefully lead to more plants opening back up. The chart below is for July corn and you can see the change in the 20 day moving average as it has begun to tick up.

Soybean prices got a boost this week as Chinese buying continued, despite the government telling companies to quit buying many U.S. Ag products in retaliation to Trump’s comments and policies about Hong Kong last week. Despite what people thought would initially hurt Chinese purchases, tensions seem to be cooling between the two countries (for now). A huge week of soybean meal exports helped fund short covering that gave beans a big boost on Thursday. Continued buying from China would be very supportive for beans, but a decline could see a retreat after recent strength. Look for bean planting to continue its good progress over the next week.

Cotton traded above $.60/pound this week for the first time in the July contract since March 16. Rising futures prices with smaller open interest usually leads to a price reversal, which this price move has seemed to follow. With more open interest in the December contract month, look for more volatility moving forward as speculators will look there. We are barely into the start of hurricane season and already on hurricane number 3 forming in the gulf. A long and consistent hurricane season could do a great deal of damage to the southeast Cotton crop. Cotton has always been sensitive to the U.S. dollar, so a weakening dollar the last couple of weeks has been supportive to prices.

DOW Jones

The Dow Jones continues its climb as it topped 26,000 this week. The markets have recovered quicker than many expected to get to this point. As states across the country have opened back up investors have an optimistic outlook for the rest of 2020. Continuing progress on the Covid-19 vaccine and no spikes in positive test results are all good things for the market and overall economy of the US. This will help people get back to work quickly and hopefully minimize the damage of the long shutdowns.

Crude Oil

Crude continues its climb back to normal prices as OPEC is in discussions to continue production cuts for June. Even though the world is opening back up and oil demand will ramp up, drilling needs to happen at the same rate to not create an oversupply. This agreement being extended would be supportive for crude.

29 May 2020

AG MARKETS UPDATE: MAY 23-29

Planting is almost complete across the country as the final reported number was 88% planted this week. The weather outlook into early June is promising for many areas that were delayed in planting to still be able to get their crop in the ground in early June with the exception of parts of North Dakota that will be hard to catch up. With little news in the markets this month, trade has been pretty stagnant. July corn did trade at $3.30 in the July contract for the first time in over a month on Thursday before falling back to $3.27 ½ at the close. If July corn could close above $3.30 for the month of May it would be a very welcome sight after a month of very limited trading range.

(Barchart.com)

 

Soybean planting was estimated to be 65% complete this week, still well ahead of the average for this time of year. Like corn, the weather for the next week is promising for planting progress across most of the country. Purchases from China gave beans a boost early in the week but no follow up purchases have kept the news slow and prices steady. Any purchases from China, as has been the trend, would be helpful to prices along with an easing in political tensions. ASF news has been quiet as Covid-19 has been the big news story, but as China continues to replenish its hog populations that should help purchases in the future. November beans have been trading between $8.30 and $8.55 for most of the last month with $8.50 the current landing spot. While the bulls have been hopeful of size-able Chinese purchases, the reality has been small purchases with much of their purchases coming from Brazil.

(Barchart.com)

Crude Oil prices have had a great rally despite early worries that we would have another bottleneck problem like we did with the May crude contracts for July. As people around the country are going back to their daily lives, in some capacity they are driving again. The rest of this year should see increasing travel by car as people will look to drive to vacations rather than hoping on a plane. See the chart below to see the impressive rebound for the month of May.

(Barchart.com)

DOW Jones
The Dow Jones has continued its surge up as May will post another large gain despite record unemployment numbers. As states have begun reopening, traders are seeing this as promising for the markets as people will hopefully be returning to work. People continue to work from home in many major cities, or have the option to work from home, and will probably continue doing this as the summer goes on until the public feels safe to return to close to normal.

CFAP Relief Package
Enrollment for the CFAP Relief Package began this week on the 26th. If you have not already, reach out to your local FSA office to begin this process to make sure you do not miss out on any opportunity. The CFAP had scheduled payment of 32 cents per bushel from the original CARES Act and a CCC payment of 35 cents per bushel on the lower of 50% of last year’s production or 50% of your unpriced corn on January 15th. That works out to potentially receiving 67 cents on half of last year’s corn crop. The soybeans payment works the same with payments of 45 cents and 50 cents for a potential payment of 95 cents per bushel on 50% of last year’s bean crop. The math is not clear nor why January 15th was chosen, but those are the guidelines. Livestock is also covered in the payment and information on that from the USDA website can be found here. For more information on how to sign up for the CFAP Relief Package, check out this video.